Shakespeare's Sonnet Pens most popular works
Literary Gifts and Map Keepsakes. Gifts for book lovers. Jane Austen gifts. Wedding gifts to celebrate long distance love. Birthday presents for bookworms.
book lover gifts. bookworm gifts. map gifts. keepsakes, wedding prints, anniversary prints, wedding gifts, book quotes, Jane Austen gifts, pride and prejudice gifts, Irish designer, Irish stationery design, bibliophile, paper anniversary, map prints, long distance love gifts, literary gifts, Irish gifts, handmade in Ireland, poetry gifts, film lover gifts, personalised anniversary gifts, map heart print, engagement and wedding gift, map location gift, emma quote, jane austen quotes,
3790
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-3790,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,footer_responsive_adv,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,columns-4,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-11.2,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.0.1,vc_responsive
shakespeare sonnet pens

Choosing the best Shakespeare’s Sonnet

When I first got the idea for my Shakespeare Sonnet Pens I had a mammoth task ahead of me, deciding which of Shakespeare’s Sonnets I should offer on my pens.

Now of course a customer can ask for a Shakespeare sonnet that is not on the ‘list’ but you have to have a base to work from. So I asked everyone what their favourite Shakespeare sonnet’s were and these were the results that gave me my base collection. I have added links at the end of each sonnet on this page with further reading on the sonnets, including a study of their meaning, history and evolution.

Shakespeare Sonnet 18 

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed,
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature’s changing course untrimmed:
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st,
Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st,
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Further reading on Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18

Shakespeare Sonnet 30

When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past,
I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
And with old woes new wail my dear time’s waste:
Then can I drown an eye, unused to flow,
For precious friends hid in death’s dateless night,
And weep afresh love’s long since cancelled woe,
And moan the expense of many a vanished sight:
Then can I grieve at grievances foregone,
And heavily from woe to woe tell o’er
The sad account of fore-bemoaned moan,
Which I new pay as if not paid before.
But if the while I think on thee, dear friend,
All losses are restor’d and sorrows end.

Further reading on Shakespeare Sonnet 30

Shakespeare Sonnet 33

Full many a glorious morning have I seen
Flatter the mountain tops with sovereign eye,
Kissing with golden face the meadows green,
Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy;
Anon permit the basest clouds to ride
With ugly rack on his celestial face,
And from the forlorn world his visage hide,
Stealing unseen to west with this disgrace:
Even so my sun one early morn did shine,
With all triumphant splendour on my brow;
But out, alack, he was but one hour mine,
The region cloud hath mask’d him from me now.
Yet him for this my love no whit disdaineth;
Suns of the world may stain when heaven’s sun staineth.

Further reading on Shakespeare Sonnet 33

Shakespeare Sonnet 73

That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou see’st the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west;
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire,
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed, whereon it must expire,
Consumed with that which it was nourish’d by.
This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well, which thou must leave ere long.

Further reading on Shakespeare Sonnet 73

Shakespeare Sonnet 104

To me, fair friend, you never can be old,
For as you were when first your eye I ey’d,
Such seems your beauty still. Three winters cold,
Have from the forests shook three summers’ pride,
Three beauteous springs to yellow autumn turned,
In process of the seasons have I seen,
Three April perfumes in three hot Junes burned,
Since first I saw you fresh, which yet are green.
Ah! yet doth beauty like a dial-hand,
Steal from his figure, and no pace perceived;
So your sweet hue, which methinks still doth stand,
Hath motion, and mine eye may be deceived:
For fear of which, hear this thou age unbred:
Ere you were born was beauty’s summer dead.

Further reading on Shakespeare Sonnet 104

Shakespeare Sonnet 116 

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark,
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
  If this be error and upon me proved,
  I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

Further reading on Shakespeare’s sonnet 116

Just added …

Shakespeare’s sonnet 29

When in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes
I all alone beweep my outcast state,
And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
And look upon myself, and curse my fate,
Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
Featured like him, like him with friends possessed,
Desiring this man’s art, and that man’s scope,
With what I most enjoy contented least;
Yet in these thoughts my self almost despising,
Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
Like to the lark at break of day arising
From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven’s gate;
For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings
That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

Further reading on Shakespeare sonnet 29

 

You can purchase my Personalised Shakespeare Sonnet Pens here

These personalised Shakespeare pens make beautiful wedding gifts. Sonnets on love

These personalised Shakespeare pens make beautiful wedding gifts. Sonnets on love

No Comments

Post A Comment